Subscription Box Review- DC Legion of Collectors: Teen Titans

It’s my first post of 2018, and we are starting off with the latest DC Legion of Collectors  box by Funko.  This month’s theme is the Teen Titans, based off of the “New” Teen Titans comics that ran from 1980 to 1996.  Will this box rate a “Boo Yah!” from Cyborg?  Let’s take a look!

For those unfamiliar with the Teen Titan’s history, here is a little back story.  Originally conceived as a team made up of the sidekicks of various Justice League members, the Teen Titans featured Robin, Kid Flash, Speedy (Green Arrow’s sidekick), Aqualad and Wonder Girl. The group had two series in the 60’s and 70’s (plus a cartoon that omitted Robin) and was mildly successful.  But in the 70’s, the trend was to age up the sidekicks:  Robin and Kid Flash went to college, Speedy became a heroin junkie.  Aqualad… got wet, and Wonder Girl went to comic book limbo as she never really fit into the Wonder Woman comics at the time.

Then, in 1980, the series was revived.  Guided by the creative Team of Marv Wolfman and George Perez, the series reunited Robin, Wonder Girl and Kid Flash along with Beast Boy (then called Changeling) from Doom Patrol.  It also introduced three new characters:  Cyborg, Starfire and Raven, all who are would be familiar to those who watch the recent cartoon.  The new series was called “The New Teen Titans” because, well, it was new at the time, though most of the characters were pushing 20, so, not teens.  The series saw many of the other Titans returned (Speedy got off the smack, Aqualad was…still wet) and show the evolution of two of its characters: Robin, looking to get out of Batman’s shadow, adopted the name Nightwing, and Kid Flash took over as the Flash after Barry Allen died (he got better 25+ years later), leaving the team and eventually joining the Justice League.  The comic was a hit and even had a crossover with Marvel’s #1 team at the time, the X-Men.


But enough history, let’s look at the box.  The lid features the silhouette of Nightwing in his 1980’s costume.  I had always called it his disco costume, not only because of the large collar, but also because he was written by Marv Wolfman, which made me think of the 70’s DJ, Wolfman Jack (side note, I have see pictures of Marv and he is not nearly as hairy as my 10 year old self though he’d be.).  Beside, he was the writer; George Perez probably had more influence in the design.


The lining has artwork featuring the Titan members most would be familiar with (i.e. from the cartoon)  The art seems to resemble George Perez’s work.  I could be wrong.


First out of the box is the T-Shirt.  There are two variants this month and both feature Beast Boy.  Once has him changing from a tiger, the other (i.e. this one) has him changing from a eagle.  I personally like the Changeling name better than Beast Boy, especially since he was more mature over the course of  the New Teen Titans series.


There is no flap any more and we only get a patch this time.  Cyborg is featured on the patch in his 80’s design.  It is good that this character has evolved over the years and now is part of the Justice League franchise.


We get a comic this time, too.  It is a copy of The New Teen Titans #1 from 1980.  IT features a new cover by artist Phil Jimenez, the original story from 1980 and a couple of Who’s Who in the DC Universe pages from 1986 featuring the team and the Titans Tower.  The cover is really nice and the story, well old, still holds up.


Next we get…figures!  I really like the Funko figures we have been getting and I have said that I wanted more.  There are four different figures available and you get two of them per box:  Cyborg and Starfire are featured here, but Raven and (disco) Nightwing are the other two.  Funko said there may be a way to order the figures you are missing, and I hope these turn up at comic shops and EB Games along with the other original members.


Finally, we get to the Pop!  It is Nightwing, in all his pop-collared glory!  In the comics, Dick Grayson, looking to distance himself from Batman (and wear big boy pants), decided to give up the Robin identity (which Bruce fills really quick!) and takes the name Nightwing, based on a hero he met/heard about (depending on the story) who protect the streets of the bottle City of Kandor..  Dick used that name exclusively since them, only dropping it to take over as Batman for a few months in the early 90’s and from 2009-2011 (Note.  Kandor did have a modern Nightwing for a while when Power Girl went there for a bit.)


And that is it for the box.  I really enjoyed this one as we got a lot of cool stuff and figures!  The figures have been improving over the years with these ones slightly larger than the Suicide Squad ones.  They also have ball-jointed arms (Starfire even has a ball-jointed head!)  The Golden-Age Superman figure from last April also had ball-jointed arms, but I never noticed until I compared him to Starfire! And we get a Pop of Nightwing! This is a good buy for both old and new Teen Titans fans.

The next DC Legion of Collectors box ships in March 2018 and will feature the Green Lantern Corps.  I am hoping for a Ch’p pop, Funko If you wish to get the next box, you can subscribe at .  The deadline is 1 March 2018.  By subscribing, you can order boxes from previous months like this one. (supplies are limited.)

This Review is for entertainment purposes only.  I have not received anything from Funko, DC, or Warner Bros for doing this review.  The item was purchased with my own funds.  All opinions are mine and any pictures taken are for review purposes only.

Interior shot of the comic



All the Legion of Collector Funko action figure thus far.  They are getting better.



Classic Starfire and Cyborg next to a modern Nightwing (from Mattel)

Subscription Box Review: Star Wars Smuggler’s Bounty- Jan 2017- The Empire Strikes Back

Finally, the next Smuggler’s Bounty box has arrived.  Funko decided to base this month’s theme on one of the better, if not best of the Star Wars movies, Empire Strikes Back.  Lets see how they decided to celebrate one of the most exciting chapters in the Star Wars saga..


First off, this box is huge.  It is definitely the largest of the boxes so far.  Besides the size, the only noticeable difference is the image of Luke in his Dagobah fatigues.  Other than that, it is the standard box.


Opening it up you see the standard patch and pin.  The patch is of Yoda with Empire Strikes Back written on the side.   The pin features Lando Calrissian, though, if you look at it at a certain angle, you would swear it’s a pin of Lionel Ritche.  I can’t be the only one, right?


Beneath the flap, we find another little Star Wars plushie.  This time, we get a Wampa, the creature thar captured Luke on Hoth.  It is very cute and has nice soft fake fur.  Including the Boba Fett one from a half a year back, I now have two from this line.


Funko has given us hats and shirts so what other clothing items will they branch into?  How about socks?  Yes, we get a pair of Pop! Socks, with a Star Wars theme, featuring Pop heads of Darth Vader and Storm Troopers..  They fit me fine (size 10 1/2 feet) and are mostly polyester.


Last is the much hyped Han on a TaunTaun.  This was revealed at least a far back as November and it looks fantastic.  Han is wearing a brown coat (which I thought was blue; even my action figure of him had a blue coat) but obviously, Funko falls into the brown camp.  It doesn’t bother me but I’d hate to start a debate like the blue and gold/white and gold dress from the internet last year.  Anyways, the Han Soo Pop is not removable from the TaunTaun, but it comes with a large base with pegs to plug into the Tauntaun’s feet.  Finally, the Han figure is a bobble head, but the Tauntaun isn’t.

It’s brown! It’s blue!  WHO CARES!

This newest box may seem a bit light, but it is still a good value.  The deluxe Pop definitely is of the most value and is the best part of the box.  The socks are nice and I could always use more (they get lost so easily.)  The plushie is nice.  I’d give it to my dog, but he’d destroy it in seconds.


The next Smuggler’s Bounty box will ship in March 2017.  January’s theme is Star Wars Rebels, the current animated show on Disney XD.  The Smuggler’s Bounty page promises an exclusive Darth Maul Pop! bobble head in that box..  You can subscribe to Smuggler’s Bounty at  You can also purchase the previous boxes like the one just reviewed, but supplies are limited.  The deadline to subscribe for the Empire Strikes Back box is 15 March, 2016.

I hope you enjoyed this review.  Excuse me as I look for my Lando pin.  I seem to have misplaced it.

Hello?. Is it me you’re looking for?


Subscription Box Review- DC Legion of Collectors- Batman Villains- Nov 2016

Here we are, the latest box  of the Funko/DC Comics Legion of Collectors subscription.  This months theme is Batman Villains.  Will this box make us a giddy as the Joker or will it disappoint us like Killer Moth?  Let’s get into it.


Nothing new on the box front, except it is pretty hefty this time around.  The box features the silhouette of the Joker on it.  The inside of the box is decorated with comic panels of various Bat-villains. mostly in their classic Silver Age looks.


On the top flap are the patch and pin.  The patch is of Bane, the man who broke Batman’s back (after coming out of nowhere)  The patch is designed to look like his luchador mask like he wears in the comics.  The pin features the Riddler, more specifically, his silhouette, and is dome in black and green.  It is a very nice pin.


The comic is a reprint of Batman (2011) issue 23.2, which was a part of Villain Month.  The story features The Riddler, so it is fitting that the cover shows a Popified Riddler with a tied up Robin, with Batman swinging in for the rescue.  The story is a stand alone one, with no appearance of Batman or any other hero.



Next up is a new mug.  Funko continues to release new Pop mugs based on various properties and this time it is the Joker.  The mug is really nice  with the Joker’s eyes being all swirly.  Like all the Funko mugs, they are a bit hard to drink out of  but there of a very good quality.IMG_1504.JPG

We also get another hat from Funko’s Pop Top line.  This hat is grey, black and purple and features The Joker.  No worries about Batman’s most iconic villain being underrepresented.  The hat is nice and it is good to switch up with the T-shirts once in a while


Next up, you get one of Funko’s other line of vinyl figures, Dorbz.  In this month’s box, you get a Dorb of Two Face.  Now, if you though the Pops were cutesy, the Dorbz (short for “Adorable,” get it?) are even more so..  Even Two Face’s scarred side is cute.  This is my first Dorb and I like them, but between them and the Pops, I’ll stick to Pops,


And finally, we get to the Pop!  Funko decided to go for a classic Batman villain,  Catwoman.  She is featured in her Silver Age “more anti-hero than villain” look.  Surprisingly, this is the first Catwoman pop of her in a comic accurate costume.  It is not her current costume, but I do remember it from comics I had read in my youth.


This box was definitely a solid one.  The Dorb was a nice get and the mug and hat really added to the value.  Three boxes in and I am still interested in seeing what the next box will be.  I am still hoping for more of the figures:  Harley and Joker need someone to face off with.


The next Legion of Collectors box will be shipping in early January 2017.  The next box’s theme is DC Legacy, with the ad featuring classic versions of Batman, Green Arrow and Plastic Man.  You can subscribe at in order to get your box.  The deadline is 1 Jan 17.  Subscribers can order any of the previous boxes, but supplies are limited.  I hope you enjoyed this review.


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Subscription Box Review: DC Legion of Collectors- Women of DC box (Sep 2016)

Legion of Collectors, Funko’s DC comics-themed collector’s box has released another installment.  This month’s theme is “Women of DC,” celebrating the sensational heroines and perilous villainesses of the DC Universe.  Funko did a similar theme with their Marvel box a few months back and delayed this one for a bit.  Let’s see if it was worth the wait.


As expected, the box features art that reflects this month’s theme.  As it is Women of DC, what better character to feature than DC most iconic and longest running female superhero?  Wonder Woman is celebrating her 75th anniversary so it is fitting she is on the box.


Inside we get the standard pin and patch.  The patch features Batgirl, depicting her cowl and her bright blue yes.  The pin is of Harley Quinn, in her classic costume.  Fans of Harley Quinn will appreciate that, as there has been much division over her current comic getup and her movie outfit (featured in the previous collector box).  Both look great and, with Wondy on the box, all three DC women from the preview have been featured.


Moving under the flap, we get this month’s t-shirt.  There are two versions:  one featuring Supergirl, Batgirl and Wonder Woman and one featuring Harley Quinn, Poison Ivy, and Catwoman.  All the shirts come in a dark grey colour.  The art has a classic 80’s art look (I can’t place the artist.  George Perez, maybe?)  and almost looks like a stamp.  I got the Heroes shirt, but I think the villains one could use less Bat-Villains.  Really, no Cheetah?


Next is the comic.  We get a copy of Batgirl #35, the first part of the Batgirl of Burnside story arc.  The cover features Pop version of several DC heroines, including Batgirl, Katana and Wonder Woman.  The comic itself is pretty great, too, as Batgirl has been one of the better parts of DC’s Nu-52 reboot.  You can find it collected in Batgirl Vol 1: Batgirl of Burnside.


The next item is what they delayed the box for.  It is a Wonder Woman Invisible Jet.  Inspired by the classic 1970’s TV show and the 75th anniversary of the character, this set invokes the classic 70’s and early 80’s era of Wonder Woman (before they decided Amazons having invisible jet technology was too ridiculous)  The jet is made of clear, durable plastic .The figure is tiny, with only four points of articulation and, although Funko says she was inspires she from the TV show, she features the later double “W” symbol, not the eagle on her bustier.  Minor nitpick.  Though I wish she was the size of the Suicide Squad figures from the last box.


Finally we come to the Pop vinyl. Funko did not have to loo far for a female character that they did not do a Pop of and they chose Hawkgirl.  Based on her classic comic book look, not the TV version, Hawkgirl has the wider stance of the male figures and is pretty easy to get standing.  Collectors of comic accurate pops will appreciate her look and she will fit in their collections.  I think Hawkgirl was a good choice, as she is getting some exposure, both on Legends of Tomorrow and in DC Super Hero Girls.

So this was a solid box for me.  The shirt is good, the pop is good and the extras held the them together.  I’m a bit disappointed in the size of the Wonder Woman figure, after last box debut of their new action figures, but then the jet would have been too expensive to make.  Still, as it is, you can’t deny the value you get in the box.


The next Legion of Collectors box will be shipping in early November.  The next box’s theme is Batman villains.  You can subscribe at in order to get your box.  The deadline is 1 Nov 16.  Subscribers can order any of the previous boxes, but supplies are limited.  I hope you enjoyed this review.


Subscription Box Review: Star Wars Smuggler’s Bounty: Bounty Hunter Box (May 2016)

Funko has released the May 2016 edition of its Star Wars-themed Smuggler’s Bounty Subscription box. Their newest box celebrate the Bounty Hunters, some of the coolest-looking yet criminally underused characters in the Star Wars movies. Let take a look inside to see what we get this time!


This month’s box is what we have come to expect from the subscription.  This month, a FUNKO-ized Boba Fett is featured on the box.  Since he is the most recognizable bounty hunter in the Star Wars series, it is appropriate for him to feature on the box.  Who else would they put there?  Bossk?  The Star Wars logo is featured as well, without the “The Force Awakens” subtitle like the last few boxes.  That was a minor nitpick I had with the Cantina box, so it’s good to see that FUNKO is changing things up.


Under the lid we see our standard club pin and patch, reflecting this month’s theme.  The pin features the reptilian bounty hunter, Bossk, who has all but three seconds of screen time, but was fleshed out in the books and in the Clone Wars cartoon.  The patch is rightly everyone’s favorite clone son of Jango Fett, Boba Fett.  There is even the Mandalore symbol on the patch too.  I’d like to see a Mandalore themed box in the future, perhaps with some characters from the Clone Wars cartoon and Sabine Wren from Star Wars: Rebels.


The next thing is the T-Shirt.  This time we get some awesome art of various bounty hunters from the Star Wars universe, including Boba Fett (of course).  The art features descriptions of the gear and weapons of each of the featured characters.  It is good to see that the shirts will vary in art style from box to box.  While the ones featuring FUNKO-ized characters are good, some straight-up Star Wars T-shirts is nice to have.


Now for the main draw of this subscription box, the FUNKO Pops!  We get two of them this time and both are extra special.  We get the killer robot, IG-88 and, of course, Boba Fett!  I’m sure there would have been an outcry if one of the Pops weren’t old Boba here, but FUNKO delivered.


IG-88 is a brand-new Pop created for this subscription.  He (or “It”) had not had a Pop released up until now.  His unique  look will make the figure stand out amongst your other Pop vinyls as his head is much skinnier.  Still, the sculpt captures the look of the character perfectly.


Boba is unique too as his stand is built in to the sculpt.  He is in a launching pose, with the fire and exhaust from his jet pack serving as the stand for the figure.  This is a perfect pose for the character, as it shows how awesome the character could be, if only he wasn’t defeated so easily in Return of the Jedi.

This has been my favourite box so far in the Smuggler’s Bounty subscription.  The Bounty Hunters looked awesome to me as a kid and Boba Fett is my all-time favorite, if only for the fact he was a mail-in figure I got as a kid and the comics and books I’ve read and the games I played with him make him seem like a bad-ass.  There was not little item like a pen or lanyard this time around, but the overall awesomeness of this month’s offering made up for it.

Smuggler’s bounty will ship again in July with the Jabba’s Palace box.  You can subscribe to Smuggler’s Bounty at  You can also purchase the previous boxes like the one just reviewed, but supplies are limited.  The deadline to subscribe for July’s box is 15 July, 2016.  May the Force be with you!


Graphic Novel Review: He-Man and the Masters of the Universe Mini-Comic Collection

He-Man mini-comics
iHe-Man mini-comics

As a child in the early 1980’s I remember when the He-Man toys first came out,  They were different from anything else on the shelves at that time, a strange combination of Conan and Star Wars.  At first, though, there wasn’t any cartoon to introduce us to those characters.  To do that, each Masters of the Universe toy came with a mini-comic.  Those first books introduced us to He-man, Teela, Man-At-Arms and others as they fought Skeletor and his minions over the power within the mysterious Castle Grayskull.  These pack-in mini-conics lasts the entire line, even in its sister , Princess of Power and reappears in some form in the later lines.  Now all those classic stories are collected into one book.

This one.
This one.

He-Man and the Masters of the Universe Mini-Comic Collection is a hardcover graphic novel published by Dark Horse Books, in association with Mattel and DreamWorks Animation.  The book reprints all 51 of the original mini-comics from the original Master of the Universe toy line, plus all the Princess of Power mini-comic and books from subsequent lines.  There are also interviews with various writers and artists that worked on the line.

First of all the reprinted books look amazing.  The original mini-comics were not that big but to see the art in a bigger, almost regular-sized comic format is great.  The art, for the most part, looks good in a bigger size and you can really see the details.  The colours are good too, albeit not a vibrant as comics today with the advent of computer colouring.  As mentioned before, the book is a hardcover and is fairly hefty, due to containing so much material.

The stories hold up well, despite being written for a boy’s toy line 30 years ago.  The earlier stories are an especially interesting read, as it is very different from what be got with the cartoons series.  He-Man was not Prince Adam, but a warrior from a jungle tribe.  There was no Sorceress, but a Goddess, a green skinned (as first) woman that gave He-Man his “techo-vest” with gave him his super strength and invulnerability.  Man-At-Arms was not the King’s armourer, but the caretaker of lost technologies after  a cataclysm wiped out civilization, and Skeletor was a demon from another dimension, seeking the power sword to conquer Castel Grayskill and unleash his kind on the world. The comics slowly build up the mythos of Masters of the Universe, adding details to certain character’s back stories (Teela is the clone/daughter of the Goddess/Sorceress) and introduced elements from other sources like Prince Adam (originally appeared in the DC Comics mini-series) and Oroko (from the FIlmation cartoon.)  Even though some elements were dropped as the series went on to be similar to the cartoon, the mini-comics were its own entity.

The original mini-comics were more like a story book, with different takes on He-Man and the Sorceress
The original mini-comics were more like a story book, with different takes on He-Man and the Sorceress

There are interviews with some of the creative talent involved with the mini-comic, with names that would be recognizable by fans of comics and pop culture.  The first few mini-comics (which were more like mini-story books) had art from Alfredo Alcala, who worked on various DC and Marvel properties, including Conan the Barbarian.  Other names that some might recognize are writers Gary Cohn (various DC Comic books in the 80’s), Christy Marx (Jem), artists Mark Texeira (Wolverine, Punisher) and Bruce Timm (Batman: The Animated Series and the DC Animated Universe) and even lettered Stan Sakai (creator of Usagi Yojimbo.)  The interviews go into their involvement in the MOTU series and their memories of working on the project.

Reading these mini comics gain is definitely a nostalgia trip for me.  I remember some of the stories, especially the early ones but there were some that I did not remember until I read them again.  Most of them I did not read before, as I lost interest in the toys due to the silly Filmation cartoon, but it is clear from this collection the mini-comic followed its own path.  Sure, some stories were blatant 12-panel adds for the new wave of figures or vehicles (Battle Bones really did not need an origin story!) but there are some hidden gems.  Original stories like Slave City and The Secret of the Elixir of Life introduced original characters that were not toys or on the cartoon.  Some were pretty violent, but not gory, with He-Man punching his foes or shooting them with a laser gun.  Nothing over the top, but it raised eyebrows them and would do the same (at least) today.

The book also reprints the Princess of power mini-comic which, like the He-Man ones, don’t follow the cartoon series.  the stories feature She-ra as she and here friends foil the schemes of Catra, Entrapta and others.  Only one story has the Horde in it and then, it is only Horde Troopers. There is also the mini-comics from The New Adventures or He-man (1989-1990) which has He-Man and Skeletor continue their battle in space in the far future and two retailer exclusive comics from the 2002 Master of the Universe reboot.  Finally, the book reprints three mini-comics released in the subscription-exclusive Master of the Universe Classics toy line.

Alongside The Art of He-Man book or by itself, this is a great book for fans of the various incarnations of He-Man.  As a trip down memory lane or as a way of learning more about the series, this is a great book to add to your collection.

He-Man and the Masters of the Universe Mini-Comic Collection is available online, in comic book stores and book outlets everywhere.  Check the web or your local stores for price and availability.  It is also available as a 2 volume digital edition on Amazon.


Book Review: The Art of He-Man and the Masters of the Universe


The 1980’s were a good time for toy companies.  Some of the most memorable boy’s toys were first released in the early to mid 80’s..  Toys like The Transformers, GI Joe and Star Wars filled the shelves and inspired many kids with their plastic figure and play sets.  One of the more memorable ones was the Masters of the Universe line.  I remember characters such as He-Man, Skeletor, Teela, Beast-Man and Man-at-Arms inhabiting a world that was part Star Wars, part Conan the Barbarian.  I remember play set  and vehicles like the Battle Ram and Point Dread.  Like many toys properties, it had its tie ins:  cartoons, lunch boxes, clothing and even a live action movie.  The book, The Art of He-Man and the Master of the Universe looks at the toy lines 30+ year history covering the various toy lines (including Princess of Power) media and tie-ins.

The book is a large full color book with glossy pages and photos.  The book starts with the beginning of the line, reproducing memos, concept art and shows prototypes of what would become He-Man. Skeletor and Beast Man.  It goes into the line, showing early sketches of produced characters (and some that weren’t) and interviews with those who worked on the line.  It also goes into the mini comics, comic book adaptations and the cartoon series from Filmation, both He-Man and the Masters of the Universe and She-Ra: Princess of Power.  it even goes into the movie starring Dolph Lundgren., subsequent revivals (The Adventures of He-Man from 1989-1991 and the revived Masters of the Universe cartoon from 2002-2004) and the current subscription line from

There is really a lot in this book.  There are pages from the mini-comics that I haven’t seen in years  and art work of characters that I have forgotten about or never knew existed.  The authors of this book, Tim and Steve Seely really delve into the history of the franchise, bringing sketches and artwork to light that would have remained forgotten.  Interviews with people who worked on the toys, the various cartoon series and the comic books really go into detail about their experience with the line.

The Art of He-Man and the Maters of the Universe is a great book for anyone that was or is a  fan of the property.  There is so much information about the toy line and  the cartoon, you are bound to learn something new.  The only thing missing is full reprints of the original  mini comics but you will have to get another book for that (and there is no room in this book anyways.)  I highly recommend this book.

As they say on Eternia, “Good Journey”